How your caregiving experience can be a gift to others

My father and Aunt Peggy on her wedding day, 1956.

I received a letter from my Uncle Jim this week, updating me on how my Aunt Peggy is doing. She is my father’s youngest sister and has dementia. My father’s side of the family has been decimated by the disease and Peggy has been living with the disease for years. Jim has been an amazing caregiver to her and patient in navigating the choppy waves the disease presents. She is doing as well as can be expected, and is able to take advantage of resources offered by Australia’s stellar healthcare system.

A few years ago, I sent Jim a copy of Chicken Soup for the Soul: Living with Alzheimer’s and other Dementias. A story of mine about my father, French Toast, is included in the collection, but I also thought Jim might appreciate the wealth of information that was shared by the dozens of dementia caregivers who contributed to the collection. In his recent letter, he mentioned the book and the information I shared about my father’s struggles with swallowing in the end stage of the disease. He thanked me for sharing the information and how it had been helpful while caring for Peggy.

Caregiving can feel very isolating. When caring for someone with dementia, that isolation can feel even greater, as friends and sometimes even other family members maintain a distance, not sure how to help or struggling to accept the diagnosis. But in those moments you might be learning something that, when shared with others, can make their caregiving lives easier.

Don’t be afraid to share the lessons you have learned on your caregiving journey. Knowledge is a precious gift and what we learn from fellow caregivers can be more meaningful than what we learn in books.

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