‘Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts’ a tender yet sobering documentary

I strongly believe that to reach people about an issue they are unfamiliar with, presenting them with experiences from real folks is the way to go. The new PBS documentary, Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts, does just that, highlighting the emotional toll the disease takes on caregivers, while also demonstrating the physical and financial consequences associated with the disease.

The documentary doesn’t sugarcoat the situation. It uses the term, “families in crisis” and how our government and society are largely failing to meet their needs. As those of us who have personally been touched by dementia likely know but the general public may be less aware, Alzheimer’s doesn’t discriminate based upon race. The Duartes in Springfield, Missouri are one of the families highlighted in the documentary. Daisy takes care of her mother, Sonia, who was diagnosed with early-onset familial Alzheimer’s at the age of 57.

Families like the Duartes are fighting back, by participating in clinical trials and telling their story to lawmakers. Daisy spoke to members of Congress, who gave a sympathetic ear and related their own tales of family members with Alzheimer’s. Right now, our government is in turmoil, but we must keep the momentum going in the battle against Alzheimer’s and in our campaign to better support caregivers.

The documentary also highlights Rick in Florida, who is overwhelmed by the high cost of residential Alzheimer’s care, when his mother’s condition prevents her from staying in her home. Rick is also saddled with guilt and remorse, because Phyllis is adamant about staying in her own home. This is a heartbreaking decision that so many families face.

I highly recommend this documentary. While it is tough to watch families struggle with this disease, there are people out there dedicating their lives to finding effective treatment and supporting caregivers. Hopefully this film will inspire others to join the fight.

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