Category Archives: Awareness & Activism

Are There Do’s and Don’ts When it Comes to Dementia? — We Are Dementia Strong

This is a great list from We Are Dementia Strong. Basically it boils down to treating your loved one with dementia like the person you’ve known, not solely by their dementia. This disease tries to strip people of their humanity and its caregivers’ duty to try and maintain dignity whenever possible.

Some other friends just may find it too hard to see me like I am. I didn’t like seeing my Grandfather or my Mother while they were on their Alzheimer’s Journey so, I understand.

via Are There Do’s and Don’ts When it Comes to Dementia? — We Are Dementia Strong

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May 30, 2020 · 5:31 pm

How to know it’s time to consider Memory Care? — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

With extra time spent at home in the midst of a pandemic, you may be in touch with your elder relatives more than ever. This is a great time to review the health status of your older relatives. When people are thrown off their routine, symptoms of dementia may become more apparent. This post from The Diary of an Alzheimer’s Caregiver offers excellent tips on when to consider memory care.

Sign up to get these posts and a whole lot more delivered right to your inbox! The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver – Appreciate the good, laugh at the crazy, and deal with the rest! Brain disorders like Alzheimer’s, Dementia, etc. are progressive conditions. In these diseases, the patient’s health tends to deteriorate with time.…

via How to know it’s time to consider Memory Care? — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

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Finding healthy coping strategies as a caregiver

 

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Myriams-Fotos/Pixabay

A caregiver’s job was stressful enough before the coronavirus pandemic struck the world. But now, social isolation and anxiety, along with financial concerns, may feel overwhelming.

Over the last few years, I’ve spent time looking for ways caregivers can find a bit of respite, even if it’s just for an hour or an afternoon. What I learned from my work on Respite Care Share was that many caregivers aren’t seeking traditional respite care, which involves taking a longer physical break away from their loved one. While they would love a caregiving break, they worry about placing their loved one, especially those with dementia, in the care of a stranger while they’re away.

Based upon that feedback, I started focusing more on self-care, and finding realistic ways a caregiver can find some solace even in the midst of caregiving. It may be a cup of tea in the morning before everyone else is awake; it may be sitting in the garden while your loved one naps. Reading a chapter of a book after your loved one goes to bed. Listening to a favorite song while your loved one is occupied with an activity. It may not seem like much, but it can make a positive difference.

These are all things that can also be done during times of self-isolation. Supplements and herbal remedies may be helpful (but check with your doctor first.) On CBD for Caregivers, I published a post about relaxing beverages which are either non-alcoholic or lower in alcohol. The good news is that there are a variety such beverages available now, and many are quite tasty! One of my new favorites is Hella Cocktail Co.’s Bitters & Soda. It’s a nice beverage to sip while sitting outside in the area of the yard I’ve transformed into my respite corner.

Challenging times like these can find us slipping into bad habits like excessive drinking, smoking, overeating, etc. I hope you have or can find a healthier way to navigate these stressful times while keeping you and your family safe.

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Stay at Home with a Good Book – AlzAuthors Anthology Two is Now Available in Paperback — AlzAuthors: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Books, Blogs, Stories

Honored to have been able to share my caregiving experience that inspired The Reluctant Caregiver included in this collection.

Life these days is turned upside down for most of us, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There is so much uncertainty, fear, and loss. Those of us caring for loved ones with Alzheimer’s and other dementias find ourselves stressed, not only from our usual pressures but the new ones the virus has delivered: stay-at-home orders…

via Stay at Home with a Good Book – AlzAuthors Anthology Two is Now Available in Paperback — AlzAuthors: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Books, Blogs, Stories

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April 17, 2020 · 4:49 pm

Review the 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

The Alzheimer’s Association released their annual report around the time the coronavirus pandemic was ramping up, but I did not want to overlook the latest findings. I thought it was especially appropriate to post this today, on what would have been my father’s 88th birthday.

Here are the main takeaways from the 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report:

  • Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. 1 in 3 seniors die with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. The death rate from Alzheimer’s has skyrocketed. Between 2000 and 2018, the number of deaths from Alzheimer’s disease has more than doubled, increasing 146%.
  • More than 5 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease. Women make up two-thirds of that number; African-Americans are about twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias compared to whites in the same age group; Hispanics are about 1.5 times as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other dementias compared to whites in the same age group.
  • Unless significant medical breakthroughs are made, by 2050, the number of Americans age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s dementia may grow to a projected 13.8 million.
  • 16 million unpaid dementia caregivers provide care valued at $244 billion annually. One in three caregivers are 65 and over, and two-thirds are women. One-quarter of dementia caregivers belong to the “sandwich generation,” caring for both an aging parent and minor children.
  • The cost of Alzheimer’s care to the nation is staggering. In 2020 alone, Alzheimer’s and other dementias will cost the nation $305 billion. What’s even more sobering is that half of primary care physicians believe the American healthcare system is not prepared for the growing number of those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

While these reports highlight the challenges we face in providing care for our loved ones with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, the Alzheimer’s Association proposes an action plan focused on education and recruitment to build up a corps of geriatric providers who understand the unique challenges that those with dementia and their caregivers face. The Alzheimer’s Association also encourages greater funding in the areas of rural healthcare and telemedicine.

2020 alz report

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Farewell to Steve Dezember, who shared his ALS battle with the world

While coronavirus is claiming so many lives around the world, this week I am mourning a metro Atlanta man, Steve Dezember, who died this week after a 9-year battle with ALS.

I don’t use the term “battle” lightly and am aware of the negative connotation such terminology can engender. But in this case, I believe the term applies. Steve showed courage, grace and humor as he fought back time and time again against all odds. I have followed Steve’s story for years after watching the moving documentary, Hope for Steve.

I’ve also followed the social posts from his wonderful, equally courageous and compassionate wife Hope has shared about the challenging ALS caregiving journey that are so enlightening. I love how she embraced the importance of self-care and wasn’t shy about sharing the difficulties along with the triumphs of being a long-term caregiver. The couple also shared the financial challenges that a disease like ALS creates. Steve made paintings from his wheelchair and Hope also created a variety of art that they used as fundraisers to support his care. A painting of his hangs on the wall of my bedroom.

steve painting

Following Steve’s journey over the years has made me more appreciative of having good health and in enjoying the simple pleasures of life. It made me admire the sacrifices that spousal caregivers make to tend to their loved ones. And even though this world can seem like a miserable world to be sometimes, watching Steve fight for another day offered an important perspective.

If you have the means, consider donating to an ALS charity in the name of Steve Dezember. Learn more about his journey and share his story. Keep his lovely wife Hope in your thoughts and prayers.

I hope you and your loved ones are staying safe during this challenging time.

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Guest post: How to Help Your Senior Loved One Stay Healthy from Afar

guest post photo

Pixabay

I’ve been blessed recently to have two guest authors submit pieces to share on The Memories Project. Today’s post is written by Claire Wentz of Caring from Afar. It is an especially appropriate topic to discuss as we practice social distancing due to the coronavirus.

When you have a senior loved one who lives far away, it can be stressful to ensure they are well taken care of at all times. Travel may not always be feasible, especially if you work outside the home or have family obligations, and it can be expensive. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to ensure that your loved one is safe, healthy, and comfortable no matter how far away you are. Using technology to your advantage is always a good idea; here are some tips on how you can utilize it as well as some ideas on how to help the senior in your life stay safe and happy.

Take Advantage of Smartphones

Smartphones are a useful tool for seniors since they provide a way to contact friends and loved ones as well as a way to stream content and play games and puzzles via apps that will help keep their cognitive skills sharp. You can also download a location-tracking app to their phone so that you can locate your loved one in case of emergencies. If your loved one is unsure of how to use a smart device, look for a class near them (or online) that will help them learn the ins and outs of phones and tablets.

Help Them Invest in Smart Tech

These days, there are several different kinds of smart tech available for the home, and it’s a great way for seniors to be more independent and safe. From home security systems to voice-activated virtual assistants and smart appliances, there are so many ways seniors can utilize technology in their everyday lives and make it a seamless transition. Talk to your loved one about their specific needs, such as whether they could use a virtual assistant that will give them voice control over everything from making phone calls to turning on the oven.

Help Them Find a Hobby

Hobbies are wonderful things; not only do they help us stay happy and boost our mental health, but they can also affect our physical wellness. From playing a sport to woodworking and gardening, there are many different kinds of hobbies out there that are perfect for seniors of any age. So, talk to your loved one about their favorite things to do and help them find a group in their area to join or an online group where they can feel like they’re a part of something and remain social. If the hobby involves physical activity, all the better, as seniors need daily exercise in order to prevent many health issues and falls.

Talk to Their Neighbors

Whether your loved one owns their home or rents an apartment, it’s a good idea to talk to their neighbors and get to know them a little. Creating a rapport with the people closest to your loved one will help to give you peace of mind when you live far away, as they may be able to help out when you’re not there. Exchange information so you can stay in touch with one another, especially if your loved one lives alone or is aging in place.

Helping a loved one stay healthy and safe when you live far away can be challenging, but with the aid of technology and a few lifestyle changes, the senior in your life can ensure that they are safe and comfortable throughout the years.

Learn more caregiver tips at Caring from Afar.

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