Amazing Benefits of Massage for Alzheimer Disease Patients — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver


We often overlook the powerful benefits of human touch. Learn how massage could lift the spirits of your loved one with Alzheimer’s. And don’t forget about the benefits of massage for yourself! I find a massage to be so rejuvenating.

via Amazing Benefits of Massage for Alzheimer Disease Patients — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

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June 13, 2019 · 11:54 am

Bipartisan effort to provide families with vital data on struggling nursing homes

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Any kind of bipartisan effort in today’s toxic political climate is reason to cheer. When it involves uncovering nursing homes offering substandard care, it’s all the more reason for caregivers to be grateful.

Pennsylvania senators Bob Casey (D) and Pat Toomey (R) joined forces to release a report titled, “Families’ and Residents’ Right to Know: Uncovering Poor Care in America’s Nursing Homes.”

An investigation into reports of abuse and neglect at nursing homes in the senators’ home state prompted the report. It focuses on struggling nursing homes that have been designated a Special Focus Facility. There are 88 nursing homes that are participants in the program. Approximately 400 nursing homes are identified as candidates. Participants receive more frequent inspections and are identified to the public; candidates are not.

What the senators wanted family caregivers like you and I to know are the names of the hundreds of SFF candidate facilities, so that we can make the most informed decision possible when it comes to our loved one’s care.

You can review a list of SFF participant and candidate facilities that’s included in the report. You can also read disturbing reports of neglect and abuse that has been reported at these facilities, which includes allowing residents to escape, providing inadequate medical care and sexual assault.

I discovered a facility that my father stayed at briefly post-surgery. At the time, the facility admitted they did not have the resources to care for my father, who was in the mid-stages of dementia and often wandered.

Much more needs to be done to ensure that our nation’s nursing homes are providing proper care to our loved ones, but providing this bit of information helps families make more informed choices.

 

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Toxic Positivity Mongers in Dementialand — The Blog That Currently Has No Name

Have to say I agree with this perspective wholeheartedly. As the author of The Reluctant Caregiver, I have empathy for those of us who often find it difficult to be Miss Mary Sunshine all of the time. Sometimes life just sucks. People mean well but the best gift you can offer in such situations is simply a sympathetic ear.

I was recently introduced to the term “toxic positivity.” I instantly knew what the term referred to, and I could relate. I see it on social media….Positive vibes only…Think happy thoughts…There’s always a silver lining…It’s a great day to have a great day. And I can remember times when I was struggling and someone shot […]

via Toxic Positivity Mongers in Dementialand — The Blog That Currently Has No Name

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May 30, 2019 · 8:36 pm

A towering reminder

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This week marked the fourth anniversary of my mother’s death. I’ve hit that mark where it’s hard for me to believe that it was only four years ago. It seems like a lifetime ago.

But the towering water oak tree in my front yard serves as a sturdy reminder. It has been four years ago since the last time I had it trimmed. The reason why I remember the date of such a mundane task is because it was the day that I realized Mom was dying and that I needed to be with her. I remember the chaos of that day, with Mom getting admitted to the ER again for uncontrollable pain. I was trying to field phone calls with the roaring machinery going full-throttle outside. There was an issue with a car parked on the street and I was being asked to assist. I remember wanting to scream, “I don’t care about the damn car. My mother is dying!”

I recently had the tree pruned again, and the foreman proposed May 21, the day of my mother’s death. Somehow I thought it was appropriate. The tree may very well outlive me. It grows, it sheds its leaves in the fall, occasionally branches drop, and then it is tended to and left naked with knots. It’s akin to how time alters the grief process. One is left raw with some hardened spots, but life continues to grow.

You may never be the same after the death of a parent, but life does go on.

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The healing power of humor

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The world lost one of its great comedic talents with the passing of Tim Conway this week. My mom loved watching him on The Carol Burnett Show, and I watched episodes with her as a pre-teen and teenager.

One interesting note was that it was reported last year that Conway had dementia. His daughter had mentioned the diagnosis in court filings. But when his obituary was filed, it made note of the fact that he did not have dementia or Alzheimer’s, but instead had excess fluid on the brain.

I was pleasantly surprised to see the outpouring of condolences from a variety of generations. I was unaware of his later voiceover work for animated productions until I checked out his IMDB profile.

We could all use a little more innocent humor nowadays, with the world seemingly so full of hate and division. While one of Conway’s best-known skits (and funniest) is “The Dentist,” I stumbled upon “Dog’s Life” and thought it was hilarious. Conway became his characters, even when they were non-human. His attention to detail elevated his comedic ability to a whole new level. Enjoy, and share with anyone who needs a mood lifter this week.

 

 

 

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Marking National Nurses Week

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The week of May 6-May 12 is National Nurses Week. Caregivers of loved ones with chronic conditions resulting in frequent hospital stays get to know the profession and its members quite well.

Being a nurse means often seeing people at their worst: in pain, with mental confusion, combative or frightened. Nurses who treat those with dementia know an extra level of care and patience is required.

Nurses sometimes get labeled as superheroes but they are human, with their own families and struggles. But when they come into work, they attempt to put their own troubles aside to make someone else feel better. It’s a true act of giving.

I am grateful for the nurses who cared for my father and mother during their hospitalizations. One particular incident that stands out in my mind were the nurses at Presbyterian Hospital in Albuquerque. When they found out that it was my parents’ 40th wedding anniversary, they brought my mother a slice of cake while we were in the ICU room with my father who was in a medically-induced coma. Those busy nurses didn’t have to take the time to make that sweet gesture, but they did. I’m forever grateful.

If you know a nurse who has touched your family’s life in a positive way, reach out this week to let them know.

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Medicare and Respite Care – What Does it Cover? — The Imperfect Caregiver

Respite care is an issue I care about passionately, prompting me to launch Respite Care Share a few years ago. This guide offers an excellent overview about what respite care benefits Medicare covers. 

When it comes to our loved ones that may be living with health conditions that hinder their ability to perform everyday functions, we want to provide them with the best care. Statistics show that often, it is a family member that takes on this role as a full-time caregiver. Being a caregiver is one of […]

via Medicare and Respite Care – What Does it Cover? — The Imperfect Caregiver

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May 2, 2019 · 5:05 pm