Do you have a winter weather caregiving plan?

As a former resident of Texas, I have closely monitored the widespread power outages caused by winter storms this week. Having experienced the vicious ice storms that can strike North Texas, I am not surprised, but saddened. Texas and the entire southern region of the United States are ill prepared to handle a lengthy, severe winter blast. Governments in these states are reluctant to invest significant money to prepare for a weather event that typically only happens once every several years.

The power is slowly being restored and conditions should begin to improve in Texas. There will be calls to hold officials and utilities accountable, to better winterize the equipment so a catastrophe like this doesn’t happen again. But caregivers need a plan of their own to keep themselves and loved ones safe. If there can be any positives to come of of the crisis in Texas, it is that people will be prompted to think about their own situation and how they would survive if faced with such dire circumstances. Here are some things to consider.

  • Stay or evacuate: There are many factors to consider when deciding whether to evacuate before a significant weather event. While most people would rather remain in their homes, a loved one’s medical condition may determine what is the safest approach. Does your loved one need routine medical care, such as dialysis, that is provided at a facility? Hundreds of dialysis clinics lost power and water during the Texas storm and were unable to provide services. Does your loved one receive oxygen or on a machine that requires electricity? Rolling blackouts in Texas left some caregivers in fear of medical equipment failure. If you plan to ride out the storm, do you have the space to stock up on shelf-stable food, medications and medical supplies?
  • Power and clean water sources: In Texas, the two main issues are the lack of power, which means people can’t heat their homes, and a lack of clean water, due to frozen pipes and water treatment plant issues. As a caregiver, are you prepared to tackle these problems? Do you have a reliable backup power source like a generator? Do you have ample fuel to run such equipment? If you have a fireplace, do you have enough wood and do you know how to operate it? Do you have a supply of drinking water stored or a clean water source? People are getting creative in Texas, boiling snow to use as a water source but experts warn that this still carries health risks.
  • Evacuating after the storm: You’ve probably seen the videos of cars going sideways trying to navigate their neighborhood’s icy streets. Removing snow from walkways and digging out cars is strenuous, and can even trigger heart attacks. Will you be able to evacuate yourself and your loved ones safely if you need to leave after a winter storm strikes? Those living in rural areas may find roads to be impassable, due to heavy snow, ice or fallen trees. Road crews focus on the highways, meaning your neighborhood streets will likely not be treated. Plan your evacuation route ahead of time.
  • Reach out for help: Don’t wait until disaster strikes. If you have concerns about how you and the loved ones you care for will fare in a winter storm, address them now. Talk to other family members, neighbors, church members, etc. and make a safety plan. Talk to your loved one’s doctor if you need assistance in coordinated medical care during inclement weather. While one can hope to never have to implement such a plan, having these resources available during a crisis can make all of the difference.

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