Tag Archives: caregivers

Recharging when you can’t take a vacation

For caregivers, taking a vacation is often a non-starter. Even if someone was to gift a caregiver a cruise or a resort stay, the effort it takes to find care for loved ones makes what should be a relaxing trip a stressful endeavor.

When I was researching options for Respite Care Share, I ran into that feedback time and time again. Who would watch my loved one? Even if I could find someone, I would worry about them the entire time I was gone.

Mini-breaks can really make a difference. I had last week off from work so I treated myself to a massage and a salt room treatment. I also visited a cat cafe, which always is a mood lifter. These were all short sessions, no longer than an hour, but they were effective self-care options.

 

So this holiday season, consider giving the caregiver in your life a local option for recharging. Some great options include gift certificates for a massage or other spa service, a restaurant gift card, or tickets to an entertainment event. As part of the gift, either offer to sit with the caregiver’s loved one, or find an adult day care or home health service that can provide care. The idea is to keep it short and simple and hassle-free for the caregiver. That way, they are more likely to use the gift and most importantly, enjoy themselves!

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‘Home is still a hard place to die’

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I was interviewed for a series running on Nashville Public Radio called, “The Cost of Dying.” My interview is featured in the segment, “Home is Still a Hard Place to Die.”

I am grateful to Blake Farmer for reporting on the cost and challenges of end-of-life care. It’s a topic that is not discussed enough, until one finds themselves dealing with death in their own family.

Farmer took note of my essay, “Dying at home is not all it’s cracked up to be,” which appeared in my essay collection, The Reluctant Caregiver. That essay sparked a lot of debate on social media, because it revealed that there is another side to the aging-dying at home trend, and it’s not pretty. It’s one that family members often silently suffer through, because they feel guilty if they complain.

As it’s made clear in the Nashville Public Radio report, I am not anti-hospice by any means, and I know there are wonderful people who work in the industry. It is not a job I could imagine doing, and I think it takes a special kind of person to care for the dying and their families on a daily basis. But especially in rural areas, there are simply not enough hospice and home hospice providers available. That means the care falls upon family members, which is what I experienced with my mother. It was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done, and while I don’t regret caring for my dying mother, I wish I had been better supported.

Farmer’s series places a spotlight on the challenges of dying at home, from interviews with family caregivers to an examination of the growing hospice industry. I encourage you to listen to the series and read the accompanying reports.

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What I Wished I Knew When Dementia Was Diagnosed: Anosognosia(#1) — Dealing with Dementia

I learned a new word (anosognosia) and one that is so important for families who may suspect their loved one has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. It can be one of the most frustrating aspects for family members dealing with this disease.

Your loved one with dementia may not be able to recognize that anything has changed with their thinking and behavior.

Read Kay’s blog post for details.

via What I Wished I Knew When Dementia Was Diagnosed: Anosognosia(#1) — Dealing with Dementia

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October 24, 2019 · 6:02 pm

Caregiving 101: Maintain Your Life While Maintaining Theirs — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

This is an excellent, detailed post for first-time caregivers. Please share with those who are embarking on a family caregiving experience.

Giving your time and resources to loved ones brings feelings of delight and satisfaction while also attracting emotions of a heavy burden. Becoming a caregiver can be an extraordinarily taxing responsibility for many individuals, and therefore should not be taken lightly …

Read full post via Caregiving 101: Maintain Your Life While Maintaining Theirs — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

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October 10, 2019 · 12:17 pm

4 Realistic Self-Care Strategies for Alzheimer’s Caregivers — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

It’s something we don’t talk enough about, but it is so important: self-care. I know that phrase has become a bit touchy in certain circles, because it can seem like you are dumping one more responsibility on an already overworked caregiver. The sad truth is that in most cases, no one is going to offer you a respite out of the blue. You have to know your limits as a caregiver, ask for help when needed and yes, take care and be kind to yourself.

Read these helpful self-care tips via the blog post below from The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver.

Sign up to get these posts and a whole lot more delivered right to your inbox! The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver – Appreciate the good, laugh at the crazy, and deal with the rest! Caregiving is hard no matter what. Alzheimer’s caregivers, however, have an especially difficult job. Not only do people with Alzheimer’s…

via 4 Realistic Self-Care Strategies for Alzheimer’s Caregivers — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

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August 23, 2019 · 5:27 pm

Falls are Game Changers for Older Adults

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This is such important information for family caregivers. To put it bluntly, a fall for a frail loved one can signal the beginning of the end. Both my mother and father experienced falls as their health situations declined. Learn more and tips on preventing falls from Kay Bransford.

via Falls are Game Changers for Older Adults

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August 9, 2019 · 8:50 pm

Moving video on ‘Leaving Alzheimer’s Behind’

 

Those who have faced Alzheimer’s or other dementias in their families know that it can be a dreadful roller coaster ride, and while in the early stages there may be quite a few “good” days, they often seem overshadowed by the “bad” days.

One man in the UK who has early-onset Alzheimer’s is hoping to send a different, more hopeful message. He is using his beloved hobby of cycling to spread the message across the country.

Peter Berry was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at 50, after 3 long years of trying to obtain a diagnosis for his increasingly troubling symptoms. He sank into a deep depression for about a year, but when he emerged, he was determined to help others who find themselves in a similar situation. Through a video series and on social media, Berry shares his experience and what has worked for him, including a healthy diet, regular sleep and long bike rides.

While he’s under no illusion as to what Alzheimer’s ultimately holds in store, he stresses the importance of having a positive outlook: “People who suffer from the disease know the journey and path we’re taking. We all know the end product of this disease. But it’s all about what you do in between. It is not about what I can’t do, but what I can do.”

Watch his inspiring story, produced by Being Patient, and share with others.

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