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Book review: Fractured Memories by Emily Page

fractured memories

I’ve been following artist and family caregiver Emily Page’s blog, The Perks of Being an Artist, for quite some time now. Her blog documents her father’s battle with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and her experiences as a younger caregiver as well as being a place for her to share the amazing art she creates.

Page often injects humor into her musings, which I appreciate as she documents the difficulty of the dementia caregiving experience, which I could relate to all too well. I was sad to hear of her father’s passing, but also understood the sense that he was free from such a cruel disease.

Page has written a book about her family’s experience with dementia, titled, Fractured Memories. [Also available on Amazon.] In it, you’ll learn her family’s story, why her father was so special to her, and heartfelt journal entries that document the highs and lows of family caregiving. You’ll also get to view selections of Emily’s artwork, and why the symbol of the elephant is so important.

I highly recommend the book, especially to those who are or who have gone through the dementia experience with a loved one. There are many things caregivers will be able to relate to in the book, from the difficulties in managing those with dementia at home, to the frustration of the sometimes poor care received at expensive memory care facilities. Page accurately documents the range of wild emotions one experiences as a family caregiver to someone with dementia. Of course, everyone’s journey has unique situations, but I think most dementia caregivers will nod in sympathy with the experiences of the Page family.

While there are heartbreaking moments, there is quite a bit of humor, and most importantly, the love Page has for her father shines throughout the book. I love the symbolism of the elephant and how Page was able to use her artistic talent to express various stages of disease and caregiving. I hope you’ll consider reading Fractured Memories and recommending it to other dementia caregivers.

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