Tag Archives: nutrition

Sneaking in veggies to older people’s diets

cauli-margherita

A healthy diet can be a challenge for many people to follow, but it can become even more difficult as one grows older. Our older relatives can sometimes seem as fussy and stubborn as we were as children when it comes to healthy eating.

There are many reasons that an older person may not get enough fruits and vegetables in their diets. Deteriorating oral health can make eating raw fruits and vegetables a challenge. That’s what happened to my mother, who used to love to chomp on carrot sticks until it became too painful to do so, after a lifelong struggle with dental issues.

My father was at the other end of the spectrum, and viewed raw vegetables with great suspicion, as if they were an alien life form. The only reason he gave was that he was afraid that anything crunchy or crisp would hurt his sensitive teeth. Dad hated going to the dentist. An apple almost killed him back in his younger days, so I could understand his aversion to that fruit.

Arthritis can make the preparation efforts required in slicing carrots or peeling an orange difficult, though there are plenty of prepared products these days that take the work out of it.

Taste buds can change with age, and with the sign of disease, including everything from cancer to Alzheimer’s. Seniors are prone to decreased appetites, which can lead to nutritional deficiencies. Medical conditions may require our older loved ones to be on a restricted diet, which may lead to resentment of further dietary interventions.

I recently was sent samples of Real Good Foods Co. cauliflower margherita pizzas. I had already tried the company’s low-carb chicken crust pizza, which I liked. Since I have celiac disease, I’m always on the lookout for a new type of gluten-free pizza. I’m not a huge fan of cauliflower but it has become quite the trend over the last year or so. You can buy cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes and now, cauliflower pizza crusts.

The pizza crust browned nicely and the taste of the cauliflower was noticeable, but not overpowering. While there are tips on how to get the center of the crust crispier, it might actually be an advantage for sensitive older mouths if the crust remains on the soft side. (Even my crunch-phobic father loved DiGiorno pizza.)

Real Good also offers enchiladas, poppers and a breakfast pizza. (I’ve tried the enchiladas and breakfast pizza; both were tasty.)

Readers of The Memories Project can get 10 percent off their purchase by using the code Joy10 when ordering from the Real Good Foods website.

Pizza can make for a fun family meal, and when in bake-from-frozen form, an easy one for busy caregivers to prepare.  It can now be a good way to sneak in an extra vegetable and deliver a nutrition boost for our elder loved ones.

What tips do you have to give elders you care for a nutrition boost?

 

 

 

 

 

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Food And Alzheimer’s: How To Maximize Nutrition And Make Mealtimes Easier — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Good tips here! While my dad retained a remarkable appetite when he was in the memory care center, when he landed in the hospital, his appetite dissipated. Caregivers should be prepared to “bend the rules” and let dessert be eaten first, etc. In the end, it doesn’t matter about the order of consumption, as long as your loved one is happy and eating.

Sign up to get these posts and a whole lot more delivered right to your inbox! The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver – Appreciate the good, laugh at the crazy, and deal with the rest! 97 more words

via Food And Alzheimer’s: How To Maximize Nutrition And Make Mealtimes Easier — The Diary of An Alzheimer’s Caregiver

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August 21, 2018 · 8:35 pm

Guest article: Dealing with dementia: What caregivers need to know

By Jesse Waugh from Daughterly Care

Have you been given the rewarding yet challenging task of caring for a loved one with dementia?

Undoubtedly, caring for someone with the affliction can be very demanding both emotionally and physically.

An overall term to describe a dramatic decline in one’s mental ability, dementia can be severe enough to interfere with the patient’s day to day existence.

The following tips will help you care for a patient with dementia effectively, while helping them transition into another phase of their lives with less difficulty.

elderly_woman

Communication
In most cases, people with dementia will find communicating utterly demanding.

Chances are, they will find it difficult to verbalize, write and express their emotions in general.

In some instances, they have the tendency to also lose sight of conversation basics and might end up ignoring or interrupting you in the process.

Bridge the ‘communication gap’ by keeping in mind the following basics.

• Keep calm at all times and give them sufficient time to comprehend what you are trying to say and wait for them to respond to you.
• Make use of touch and other positive body language when communicating and make it a point to remain consistent in your approach.
• Always opt for simple and short sentences when trying to get your message across. Also, try not to argue and be condescending. Keep in mind that they still have emotions and feelings even if they might have difficulties understanding you.

Nutrition

Part and parcel of fitting elderly home care should involve carefully monitoring the patient’s drinking and eating habits.

There is a possibility for people with dementia to forget to eat and drink so keeping an eye on this key element should be considered vital.

Effectively manage their eating and other nutrition needs by taking the following pointers to heart.

• Ensure snacks and meals are offered on a regular basis. While not everyone has the same needs, 5-6 small meals a day is considered ideal.
• When possible, serve foods they are familiar with and patiently demonstrate chewing if the need calls for it.
• In most cases, patients tend to lose a lot of weight especially in the later stages of the disease. With this in mind, consider giving nutritional supplements. Consult a doctor or a dietitian so you will be given appropriate advice as to the supplements that might be helpful.

Aggression
While not true for all, there are instances when patients with dementia will exhibit some aggression tendencies.

Be on top of any possible outburst by practicing the following essentials.

• Inform friends, family and relevant health professionals if the patient displays any form of aggression.
• If fits happen repeatedly, try to observe so you can figure out what the triggers are. Once you identify what provokes the outbursts, it will be a lot easier for you to steer clear of those triggers.
• If the outbursts become frequent and unbearable, ask for professional advice so you will know how to manage it effectively.

While physically challenging and emotionally devastating, you can do much to help make dementia a bit more bearable for the patient. Equip yourself with all there is to know, seek the help and guidance of the right professionals, and you are on your way to managing dementia with ease.

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