Tag Archives: medicaid

We are all members of the Caring Majority

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I spent part of this week in Minneapolis, attending Caring Across Generation’s Field Gathering. Family and paid caregivers, along with caregiver advocates from all over the country came together to discuss strategies on how to improve the lives of caregivers and the quality of care for those at every stage of life who needs assistance.

It was inspiring to be in a room full of people who are determined to fight for something so important that has been ignored by many government officials and society for too long. Whether it’s protecting Medicaid funding, pushing for paid family leave on a state and federal level or expanding quality care options and respite opportunities for family caregivers, there are a lot of issues to address.

Some states, like Hawaii, Maine, Minnesota and Washington, to name just a few, are making inroads at the local and state level. Hawaii passed the Kupuna Caregivers Act this summer, which pays family caregivers who work $70 per day to cover the cost of caregiving. Take Action Minnesota is working with cities on securing paid sick leave, and the Maine People’s Alliance is moving forward with its support of a Universal Family Care bill and Universal Home Care ballot initiative. The more programs that are established at the local and state level that are proven to be successful, the more we can move the needle to encourage other states to implement similar programs, and eventually, gain support at the federal level.

Long-term care is one of the core issues that Caring Across Generations is working to address. Many people don’t realize that it’s Medicaid, not Medicare, that picks up the costly expenses of long-term care for our elders once personal finances are exhausted. In addition to protecting this funding, we need to work on making it easier for people to age at home. This will help reduce the cost of care.

These issues should be bipartisan, but sadly, as Americans, we’ve made values like caring for our most vulnerable populations a point of contention. But the Caring Majority is growing. We are all part of it, even if some people don’t realize it yet. Once illness touches your family, you learn very quickly how important good care is, and that it is essential. Everyone alive right now was cared for as a baby, and will likely be cared for again as they grow older. We all have a responsibility to alleviate the financial, physical and emotional burdens of caregiving.

If you are interested in learning more about Caring Across Generations, check out their website or visit them on Facebook and Twitter. If you are interested in sharing your caregiving story or attending next year’s gathering, reach out to me in the comments section below.

 

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Awareness & Activism

My top takeaways from the Aging in America conference

Respite Care Share AIA 2017

I’ve been at the Aging in America conference all week and it has been sobering and inspiring to be surrounded by so many smart, compassionate, and determined people. There are many battles to fight when it comes to issues surrounding aging and caregiving, but we have an army of advocates ready to fight for those who have been ignored by society and by government for too long.

There were recurring themes that came up at every session I attended. Here are some of the main areas of concern:

  • Health care: While it may be a political issue to those in Congress and to some voters, for those who work with seniors, the disabled, and the poor, health insurance is truly a do or die decision. The concerns about the current administration and the Republican’s proposed ACA repeal plan were explained through data and powerful anecdotal evidence. However you may feel about the ACA, and certainly it is not perfect, with some people hit with skyrocketing premiums and limited choice, there were millions of people who were able to get the treatment they desperately needed, mainly because of the ACA’s expansion of Medicaid. Don’t think you’ll need Medicaid? As one expert put it, with long-term care so expensive and not covered by Medicare, many of us will end up on Medicaid at some point, if we live long enough.
  • Diversity: While diversity can sometimes be an empty buzzword, I found that the attendees of the Aging in America conference take diversity issues very seriously. From how a doctor discusses Alzheimer’s care to a Latino family versus a Caucasian family to senior housing that welcomes the LGBT community, our aging policy must reflect the diversity of our country.
  • Help for caregivers: The issue that I’m most passionate about was also a major topic of discussion at the conference. There are many individuals and organizations dedicated to offering relief to caregivers, in the form of grants and other financial assistance, better training and support, and through respite care. I received positive feedback about my Respite Care Share concept, and I hope through the networking made at the conference, I can help take the concept to the next level.

The conference wraps up Friday, and I hope that the brainstorming that took place in Chicago this week will lead to positive impact in your communities.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Awareness & Activism