Tag Archives: family caregivers

We are all members of the Caring Majority

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I spent part of this week in Minneapolis, attending Caring Across Generation’s Field Gathering. Family and paid caregivers, along with caregiver advocates from all over the country came together to discuss strategies on how to improve the lives of caregivers and the quality of care for those at every stage of life who needs assistance.

It was inspiring to be in a room full of people who are determined to fight for something so important that has been ignored by many government officials and society for too long. Whether it’s protecting Medicaid funding, pushing for paid family leave on a state and federal level or expanding quality care options and respite opportunities for family caregivers, there are a lot of issues to address.

Some states, like Hawaii, Maine, Minnesota and Washington, to name just a few, are making inroads at the local and state level. Hawaii passed the Kupuna Caregivers Act this summer, which pays family caregivers who work $70 per day to cover the cost of caregiving. Take Action Minnesota is working with cities on securing paid sick leave, and the Maine People’s Alliance is moving forward with its support of a Universal Family Care bill and Universal Home Care ballot initiative. The more programs that are established at the local and state level that are proven to be successful, the more we can move the needle to encourage other states to implement similar programs, and eventually, gain support at the federal level.

Long-term care is one of the core issues that Caring Across Generations is working to address. Many people don’t realize that it’s Medicaid, not Medicare, that picks up the costly expenses of long-term care for our elders once personal finances are exhausted. In addition to protecting this funding, we need to work on making it easier for people to age at home. This will help reduce the cost of care.

These issues should be bipartisan, but sadly, as Americans, we’ve made values like caring for our most vulnerable populations a point of contention. But the Caring Majority is growing. We are all part of it, even if some people don’t realize it yet. Once illness touches your family, you learn very quickly how important good care is, and that it is essential. Everyone alive right now was cared for as a baby, and will likely be cared for again as they grow older. We all have a responsibility to alleviate the financial, physical and emotional burdens of caregiving.

If you are interested in learning more about Caring Across Generations, check out their website or visit them on Facebook and Twitter. If you are interested in sharing your caregiving story or attending next year’s gathering, reach out to me in the comments section below.

 

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Power of animals to offer brief respite for caregivers

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I visited a local cat cafe for my birthday, and it’s a nice way to spend an hour surrounded by cats with a good cup of coffee. It made me think about how spending time with animals offers the harried family caregiver a convenient, affordable respite from the drudgery and stress of daily duties.

I’m always on the lookout for ways caregivers can slip away for an hour or two and recharge, while their loved one is at adult day care or being cared for by someone else.

For those who love cats, watching them can be relaxing and entertaining. Just observing a cat sleeping is calming, and kittens offer plenty of entertaining hijinks during play time. Petting a purring cat has been shown to have a calming effect.

Dog lovers can visit animal shelters or rescue organizations. Many times, volunteers are needed to walk dogs or just socialize with dogs waiting for a forever home.

Owning a pet may be overwhelming if you are a caregiver, so these options allow you to still connect with the joy animals offer without adding to your workload.

Another thing I love to do is visit butterfly habitats. I found that to be such a soothing, surreal experience, walking through an area filled with fluttering butterflies.

Some may have zoos or other wildlife retreats near them that they enjoy visiting.

Anything that gets you outside of your head for a brief period of time, and focused on something delightful is a worthwhile respite. (It would be nice if caregivers could enjoy a week-long getaway of their choice, but we know that’s difficult to do in many cases.)

We also know that animals can have a positive impact on those with dementia and other diseases. I remember visiting a cat cafe in Montreal, and the daughter had brought her mother, who appeared to have dementia. They both enjoyed their visit.

For more respite care resources, visit Respite Care Share.

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A sweet and simple connection

I watched a video that has been making the rounds on Facebook lately, and I thought it illustrated how we can still reach those in the latter stages of Alzheimer’s, we just have to be flexible in our approach.

Musician Joe Fraley’s mother has Alzheimer’s, and back in October, before she was moved to assisted living, Fraley recorded a video of him and his Mom sitting on the porch while he strummed a guitar and sang.

Clearly, the woman is confused and asks poignant questions like “Who are we?” Fraley’s approach is refreshing because he keeps things light and conversational, while still addressing her concerns and not being dismissive. The woman responds to the music, and you can see how it lights up her face, even if it is just temporarily.

Not only is it important for those with Alzheimer’s to still connect with their family members in small but meaningful ways like this, I believe it is equally important for the family caregivers. While the recorded moment is still tinged with sadness, Fraley was able to reach his mother through the cloud of dementia by their mutual love of music, and that is a memory to cherish.

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